The Mesoamerican ballgame

Cover of: The Mesoamerican ballgame |

Published by University of Arizona Press in Tucson .

Written in English

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Places:

  • Mexico,
  • Central America

Subjects:

  • Pelota (Indian game),
  • Indians of Mexico -- Games,
  • Indians of Central America -- Games,
  • Indians of Mexico -- Antiquities,
  • Indians of Central America -- Antiquities,
  • Mexico -- Antiquities,
  • Central America -- Antiquities

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 347-387) and index.

Book details

Other titlesMesoamerican ball game.
Statementedited by Vernon L. Scarborough and David R. Wilcox.
ContributionsScarborough, Vernon L., 1950-, Wilcox, David R., 1944-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsF1219.3.G3 M47 1991
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 404 p. :
Number of Pages404
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1864019M
ISBN 100816511802
LC Control Number90021890

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“The Mesoamerican ballgame is well served by this thoughtfully conceived and carefully crafted collection of essays which will, no doubt, serve as a touchstone for future research.”—Latin American Indian Literatures Journal “This book holds great lasting value for the sheer number of courts recorded.”—American Antiquity/5(3).

The Mesoamerican Ballgame book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. The Precolumbian ballgame, played on a masonry court, has long i /5(8). With its scholarly attention to a subject that will fascinate even general readers, The Mesoamerican Ballgame is a major contribution to the study of the mental life and outlook of New World peoples."--Publisher's description Includes bibliographical references (pages ) and index Preface -- List of contributors -- Part I.

Northern Pages: The Precolumbian ballgame, played on a masonry court, has long intrigued scholars because of the magnificence of its archaeological remains.

From its lowland Maya origins it spread throughout the Aztec empire, where the game was so popular that sixteen thousand rubber balls were imported annually into Tenochtitlan. It endured for two thousand years, spreading as far as to what is now southern.

“The Mesoamerican ballgame is well served by this thoughtfully conceived and carefully crafted collection of essays which will, no doubt, serve as a touchstone for future research.”—Latin American Indian Literatures Journal “This book holds great lasting value for the sheer number of courts recorded.”—American Antiquity.

Mesoamerican peoples played many types of ballgames, with different rules and styles of play. These games share certain aspects, however, particularly their settings and symbolic functions. Information about the Mesoamerican ballgame comes from surviving ballcourts, ballgame artifacts and paraphernalia, and ballgame-related imagery and texts.

The Mesoamerican Ball Game is the oldest known sport in the Americas and originated in southern Mexico approximately 3, years ago. For many pre-Columbian cultures, such as the Olmec, Maya, Zapotec, and Aztec, it was a ritual, political.

The Mesoamerican ball game was a game where the action reached unimaginable levels of violence even by today’s standards. Serious injury was common as players dove onto stone courts to keep a ball in play and would end the game bloodied and bruised. In English we refer to it as the Mesoamerican ballgame.

This game, in various forms, dates back to around BC and is recognized as the first team sport ever played on earth. It originated among the Olmec people in the lowland jungle forest areas of Mexico where The Mesoamerican ballgame book for the balls was cultivated from the sap of a tree.

Buy an autographed The Mesoamerican ballgame book of the book, Mexico Unexplained, The Mesoamerican Ballgame and a Classic Veracruz yoke - Duration: Blood Sacrifice & The Ball Game - Duration.

Buy The Mesoamerican Ballgame Reprint by Vernon L. Scarborough (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(2). Book: All Authors / Contributors: E Michael Whittington; Mint Museum of Art.

Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Published in conjunction with an exhibition of the same name organised by the Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, North Carolina. the Mesoamerican ballgame\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0. “The Mesoamerican ballgame is well served by this thoughtfully conceived and carefully crafted collection of essays which will, no doubt, serve as a touchstone for future research.”—Latin American Indian Literatures Journal “This book holds great lasting value for the sheer number of courts recorded.”—American Antiquity.

From the Pages:   Ulama, The Mesoamerican Ballgame: Deadly Sport of the Ancient Americas ; Archaeologists uncover ancient Maya ball court used as a ritual centre ; The Deadly Mesoamerican Ballgame.

Some 2, ball courts have been found across Mexico and Central America. The game involved a solid rubber ball and the aim of the game was to keep it in constant.

OK, this book was produced The Mesoamerican ballgame book accompany a traveling exhibition on the Mesoamerican ballgame. It is a coffee-table book: the ratio of pictures to text is high.

The pictures represent a magnificent survey of the art depicting the ballgame throughout Mesoamerican history (or pre-history)/5(5). Ceramic figurines and the Mesoamerican ballgame \/ Susanna M.

Ekholm -- Ballgame imagery of the Maya lowlands: history and iconography \/ Marvin Cohodas -- The courts of creation: ballcourts, ballgames, and portals to the Maya otherworld \/ Linda Schele and David A. Freidel -- Ballgames and boundaries \/ Susan D. Gillespie -- Bibliography.

University of Arizona Press, Book. Very Good. Hardcover. 1st Edition. hardback, 8vo, cloth binding in red and oatmeal, lettered black, no dust wrapper, a very good tightly bound copy, text clean and unmarked, b&w illustrations, pp.

Book Edition: 1st Edition. The Mesoamerican ballgame and a Classic Veracruz yoke by Dr. Rex Koontz and Dr. Steven Zucker Yoke, c. 1 – C.E., Classic Veracruz culture, greenstone, x 38 x cm (American Museum of Natural History, Washington D.C.). The Olmec began playing ballgames around BC, an activity that soon became an important part of Mesoamerican life.

This book accompanies an exhibition at the Mint Museum of Art in North Carolina and includes 11 essays from the world's leading authorities on Mesoamerican art and culture/5.

OK, this book was produced to accompany a traveling exhibition on the Mesoamerican ballgame. It is a coffee-table book: the ratio of pictures to text is high. The pictures represent a magnificent survey of the art depicting the ballgame throughout Mesoamerican history (or pre-history).Reviews: 4.

Together with the Leyenaar and Parsons’ volume, this collection represents a resurgence of interest in the Mesoamerican ballgame and suggests a variety of approaches for future research on this topic.

Long recognized as one of the diagnostics of what constitutes Mesoamerica and its sphere of influence, the ballgame is intimately related Author: Barbara J. Price. The Mesoamerican Ballgame by Dr. Vernon L Scarborough (Editor), David R Wilcox (Editor) starting at $ The Mesoamerican Ballgame has 2 available editions to buy at Half Price Books Marketplace.

To see a more serious game, look out for the Mayan Ballgame World Cup. The second edition of the tournament was held in in Guatemala, bringing together teams from Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras and El Salvador.

The tournament aims to protect a tradition that was on the verge of dying out, and promote Mayan culture throughout the region. The Mesoamerican ballgame or ōllamaliztli (hispanized as Ulama) in Nahuatl was a sport with ritual associations played since 1, B.C. [1] by the pre-Columbian peoples of Ancient Mexico and Central sport had different versions in different places during the millennia, and a modern version of the game, ulama, is still played in a few places by the local indigenous population.

Buy a cheap copy of The Mesoamerican Ballgame book. The Precolumbian ballgame, played on a masonry court, has long intrigued scholars because of the magnificence of its archaeological remains.

From its lowland Maya Free shipping over $ The Mesoamerican ball game is a sport that people in Mesoamerica have played since about 1, B.C.E.

It was the first team sport in history, as far as historians know. The Olmecs, who lived from 1, B.C.E. to B.C.E., played the Mesoamerican ballgame. They may have created the game. The ancient Mayans played the game; they called it pitz in Classical Maya.

The Mesoamerican ballgame was played with a hard rubber ball that players bounced off their hips. Description The scene on the back of this palma vividly illustrates the tie between the ballgame.

I would agree with the merge, under the name of Mesoamerican ballgame. Madman17 April (UTC) No, you're wrong in that Ulama is a separate game, likely a descendent of the Mesoamerican ballgame. Separate articles are needed. An older and ever-so-slightly wiser Madman22 September (UTC) I agree that separate articles are.

A Mesoamerican ballcourt is a large masonry structure of a type used in Mesoamerica for over 2, years to play the Mesoamerican ballgame, particularly the hip-ball version of the ballgame.

More than 1, ballcourts have been identified, 60% in the last 20 years alone. [when?] Although there is a tremendous variation in size, in general all ballcourts are the same shape: a long narrow alley. The ball game (Olamaliztli in Classical Nahuatl, pitz in Classical Maya) was centrally important in Mesoamerican ideology, most notably that in the Maya area.

Players were not allowed to use their hands to keep the ball in motion—only their hips, thighs, or upper arms. However, for the Maya of the Classic period, the ballgame was a deeply sacred ritual, and not only a popular sport but a.

"The Mesoamerican Ballgame" Ōllamaliztli, Pok-Ta-Pok, or the modern Ulama is the first team sport in human history an done of the oldest surviving sports to this day. The earliest records of the Mesoamerican Ballgame date back to BCE, appearing in ancient Maya and Olmec ball courts.

The Mayan Ball Game was popular among people in Mesoamerica. The aim of the game was to score by getting the ball to pass through a hoop high up on the wall. Players were not allowed to use their. The sport in question, called ōllamaliztli by the Aztecs and known today as the Mesoamerican ballgame, already had a long tradition throughout Mesoamerica at that time.

Its origin dates back to the second millennium BC, making it the oldest known team ball sport, and it is therefore considered the forerunner of all modern ball sports. Cohodas, Marvin Ballgame Imagery of the Maya Lowlands: History and Iconography. In The Mesoamerican Ballgame, edited by Vernon L.

Scarborough and David R. Wilcox, pp. – University of Arizona Press, Tucson. Few Mayan texts have survived because most of the books were destroyed by which of the following.

Spanish priests. The Mesoamerican ballgame—played by the Olmecs, Mayans, and others—used what type of equipment. A rubber ball. Mexico City locals in the northern neighbourhood of Azcapotzalco are bringing back an ancient Mesoamerican tradition with a modern twist.

The town recently built a brand new community centre called Xochikialli which has been designed to teach pre-hispanic traditions. This includes lessons in Xilam, an ancient Aztec form of martial arts and classes for people who want to learn Nahuatl, the.

The speaker's photographs of ballgame vases have been widely published. Overall, his archive of 35mm color slides of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican ballgame art is the largest in the world. Thus you can count on a slide show that will be well documented with slides of professional quality. I learned a lot about the ball game and I have started on the actual flip book.

I know the easy parts of this project. I reccomend doing one of the four flaps on the Hero Twins because it is a pretty long story and it has probably been read to you in class. There is a lot of facts about the ballgame on pg.

68 in the book The Ancient Maya by. Previous Research. The importance of the ballgame to ancient Mesoamericans is reflected by the great quantity of known ballcourts, estimated at nearlydistributed over sites ().Although the rules of the game remain obscure, much attention has been paid to the ballgame as it manifests central themes of Mesoamerican civilization, especially the duality between life and death.

The Rules There has been multiple hypothesis regarding the rules of the Maya ball game. There is no phisycal evidence since most of the Mayan codex were burned by.

The association between human sacrifice and the ballgame appears no earlier than the Classic Era. While it is still unclear as to whether the winning team or the losing team was sacrificed, the practice of beheading is strongly associated with the Mesoamerican Ballgame, particularly within the Classic Veracruz and Mayan Cultures.The Mesoamerican Ballgame VERNON L.

SCARBOROUGH AND DAVID R. WILCOX, eds. xvii + pages, 86 figures, 19 tables, bibliography, index. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, $ clothbound. ISBN Reviewed by Norman Hammond, Department of Ar-chaeology, Boston University, Commonwealth Ave-nue, Boston, MA Ceramic figurines depicting ballplayers throughout Mesoamerica show that the ballgame was a wildly popular pastime and likely played by both women and men as early as B.C.

(Figure 6; see Suzanna Eckholm, “Ceramic Figurines and the Mesoamerican Ballgame” in The Mesoamerican Ballgame, ed. Vernon L. Scarborough and David R. Wilcox.

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